Tuesday, September 11, 2007

Time Heals All Wounds: September 11th

Survivors all.


















St. Paul's Chapel
Broadway between Fulton and Vesey Street
1764-1766
Thomas McBean, Architect
1794
Tower and Steeple
James Crommelin Lawrence, Architect

Some suggest that it was God's hand that helped this steeple withstand the force of the attacks on the World Trade Center, the church's neighbor to the east. But as the oldest (and now only) extant pre-Revolutionary War building, this chapel saw more than its fair share of disasters (including fires in 1776 and again in 1832) before that horrific day six years ago. While its strength might have something to do with the divine spirit, the realist (and architectural preservationist) in me prefers to think that the Manhattan schist from which it was built had a little something to do with it.



























Century 21
22 Cortlandt Street
1971
Emory Roth & Sons, Architect
Refurbished and renovated in 2002

Defying the odds, New York's "best-kept" secret" (unless, of course, you've done jury duty downtown) re-opened less than six months after the attack. I shop, therefore I am a New Yorker?


























formerly The New York Evening Post Building
20 Vesey Street
1907
Robert D. Kohn, Architect


You might not be able to smoke inside this great old building, but at least you can still buy smokes in its lobby. Another testament to the unfailing (and still burning) New York spirit.

The sculptures on the building's facade were created by Gutzon Borglum, better known for a little group of busts he created in South Dakota.

Sunday, August 26, 2007

Out of Fashion

Petticoats or jeans. Times change.



Sneak Jeans
160 Delancy Street
Removed

























Garment Center Showroom
Gone

Gee Whiz

While this manufacturer's showroom was in the city, its factory was in New Jersey. Out of business now, you can still find some of its beautiful hand-rolled scarves on eBay. Alas, not the clock.














Sally Gee
1 West 37th Street
Demolished

It's Only a Paper Box

Manufacturing -- not shopping -- was once the main business on Lower Broadway. Sadly, most firms have either relocated or gone out of business. Thankfully, A. Fleisig has chosen to stay around. And fix its clock too.























A. Fleisig
434 Broadway

Saturday, August 25, 2007

Taken to the Cleaners


















S. Bernier
Broadway and 90th Street
Demolished

I'll Drink To That

Or not.
















E. Halper Liquors
Delancy Street
Demolished


Life might begin at 8AM, but I'm not sure drinking should. Think this sign would make a cool refrigerator magnet? Click here to purchase one!






























Location information lost, along with the clock.










Discount Liquor
Broadway at 105th Street
Demolished in 1991

Still Hungry?

Broken clocks come in all ethnic varieties.


Mexican in Tribeca
Pancho Villa's
Hudson and Duane Street
Vanished






Italian on the Upper West Side
Panerella's Resstaurant
509-611 Columbus Avenue between 84th and 85th Street
Vanished




Japanese in Chelsea
Vanished

























Italian on the Lower East Side













Chinese in Chinatown
Silver Palace Restuarant
Canal and Broadway
Vanished

Time to Eat?


Blimpie's
370 7th Avenue
Broken


Just don't try to use this clock to help you make a train at nearby Penn Station.

Or Here


Lou G. Seigel
209 West 38th Street


Having abandoned its restaurant, Siegel's operates a catering establishment on 14th Street. Check out its website, though. There's a cool photo of its original 1930's restaurant and clock!

Abe Couldn't Eat Here Any More


formerly The 2nd Avenue Deli
at 10th Street
Closed




A sad chapter in the life of New York City.

A Chase bank has replaced this famous institution.

The Pretenders


Samba's
Location unknown


The clock says it all: CLOSED.



















M T Deli
Third Avenue at 23rd Street






Goldilocks Deli
Downtown
Out of Business

Smile, though your heart is aching

The delis remain (and some gastronomes want to know why) but the facades have been remodeled clocks removed.


Smiler's
726 8th Avenue
Removed




Smiler's
637 9th Avenue
Removed




Smiler's
Downtown
Removed



Smiler's
7th Avenue
Removed

Friday, August 24, 2007

Canvas The Area

and I'll bet you won't find many advertising clocks like one. In fact, you won't find this one there either.



Matera Canvas
5 Lispenard Street (near 6th Avenue)
Broken and eventually removed

And Store This

Before Fairway moved uptown, we'd use this clock as our mileage marker. When returning from visit upstate, spotting this timepiece from the West Side Highway assured us that we were only minutes from our apartment.



Originally Lee Brothers Warehouse
then Manhattan Mini Storage
571 Riverside Drive at 134th Street
Seth Thomas Clock
Circa 1935

Factor This

I have veered a bit from my original intention . . . to showcase lost/forgotten/broken exterior clocks in Manhattan.

Let me return with one of my favorites, wrecked (along with the entire building) in the late 1990's to make way for the Times Square Redevelopment.

(Factors, by the way, are really bankers, asset-based lenders, to use their own terminology. The firm, in case you are in need of money to jump-start your fashion house, is still in business.)




Originally Commercial Trust Building
then Rosenthal and Rosenthal Factors
1451 Broadway at 41st Street
1907
Demolished

And another



Originally
Central Savings Bank
now Apple Savings Bank
2100 Broadway at 73rd Street
York & Sawyer, architects
Samuel Yellin Studo, Ironworks
1928
Landmark


Look closely. The wings of these griffins have been removed from their bodies and used as the pedestal for this entranceway's clock. The meaning? Time flies, perhaps

Another Variation


Fuller Building
41 East 57th Street
1929
Walker & Gillette, architects
Ellie Nadelman, sculptor


With a nod to the classical form, Elie Nadelman brought sculpture into the "moderne" age. Gone are the characters from Greek and Roman myth, replaced with the "new" American worker set against the futuristic skyline. Not an inappropriate symbol for the headquarters (the first being The Flat Iron Building, of course) of this New York City developer.

Wednesday, August 22, 2007

Variation on a Theme


Originally New York Central Building
then New York General Building
Helmsley Building
230 Park Avenue
Warren & Wetmore, architects
Edward McCartan, sculptor
Seth Thomas Clock
1929


Once a temple to Cornelius Vanderbilt and his railroad, this building will stand forever as a monument to the recently deceased "Queen of Mean" Leona Helmsley and her husband, real estate tycoon, Harry. A stipulation agreed to at the time of its sale ordered The Helmsley name to remain on the building in perpetuity. Who says you can't live forever?

The magnificent 24-foot figures surrounding the 45-foot-wide and 19-foot-high clock were created by sculptor McCartan during his three-year tenure on the New York City Art Commission and represent, appropriately, Transportation and Industry. According to the McCartan website, "Transportation, who symbolizes the spirit of speed, rests his arm on a winged wheel of Progress and holds the staff of Mercury. On the right is a female figure, Industry, who embraces a staff in her arm, while resting on a beehive. Several other smaller symbolic figures round out the design including the Liberty Cap."

Friday, August 17, 2007

It's All Greek To Me



Originally
Bowery Savings Bank
now Capitale
130 Bowery
(between Grand and Broome)
1894
McKim, Mead & White
sculptures by Frederick MacMonnies
Landmark


What better way to say permanence, stability, strength than by adopting the monumental architecture of the ancient Greeks? Spinning the ideals of Greek democracy and egalitarian representation into capitalism and free-enterprise, 19th-century industrialists and financiers built "temples" to their own businesses, complete with mythological iconography rooted in the classics.

In the pediment of this building two figures created by Frederick MacMonnies">Frederick MacMonnies flank a substantial clock. Minerva, the Goddess of Wisdom and Justice, reclines opposite Hercules, the powerful warrior, surounded by two tame lions. The message (which 19th and 20th century Americans would have understood) was clear: Wisdom demands that you depost your money in an institution as strong and ferocious as Hercules.

Wisdom and strength gave way to partying, however, in the 1990's, as the bank became an "event" space, a rental hall for private functions.

Thursday, August 16, 2007

Time Stands Still



Bowery Bank
Second Avenue at 34th Street







This is an example of how a great photograph can make an ordinary object extraordinary. On the street this looked rather cheap and pedestrian, but in Ed's photograph it became majestic and powerful.

Drop Anchor



Anchor Savings Bank
1700 Broadway







Anchor Savings Bank
90th Street and Broadway
Vanished







Anchor Savings Bank IS still around, but these two clocks -- as well as 8.903% interest -- aren't.

Cross Out Another Bank

File this under "one good turn deserves another." Crossland Savings swallowed The Greenwich Savings Bank and then was swallowed by Washington Mutual.


Crossland Savings Bank
3 West 57th Street at 5th Avenue















Crossland Savings Bank
6th Avenue at 14th Street

Sunday, August 5, 2007

The American Way

While some people are beginning to bemoan the bankification (the proliferation of store-front branches of the major banks -- Chase, Citi, Washington Mutual -- in the heavily populated neighborhoods) of New York, the trend really began almost twenty years ago with the closings and consolidation of the small savings banks.
(the proliferation of store-front branches of the major banks -- Chase, Citi, Washington Mutual -- in the heavily populated neighborhoods) of New York, the trend really began almost twenty years ago with the closings and consolidation of the small savings banks.

The American Savings Bank's assets were purchased by the Ridgewood Savings Bank (whose building in Forest Hills has its own broken clock)in 1992 and then liquidated in 1995. I guess they ran out money trying to fix all these clocks.



American Savings Bank
First Avenue at 14th Street
















American Savings Bank
20 Union Square East
at 15th Street
Landmark



















American Savings Bank
15th Street at Union Square
flipside








Just to confuse you further, this building was the original site for the Union Square Savings Bank, created in 1924 by Henry Bacon, the designer of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC. The building is now the home of the Daryl Roth Theatre.














American Savings Bank
335 Broadway
Broken









(the proliferation of store-front branches of the major banks -- Chase, Citi, Washington Mutual -- in the heavily populated neighborhoods) of New York, the trend really began almost twenty years ago with the closings and consolidation of the small savings banks.

The American Savings Bank's assets were purchased by the Ridgewood Savings Bank (whose building in Forest Hills has its own broken clock)in 1992 and then liquidated in 1995. I guess they ran out money trying to fix all these clocks.



American Savings Bank
First Avenue at 14th Street
















American Savings Bank
20 Union Square East
at 15th Street
Landmark



















American Savings Bank
15th Street at Union Square
flipside








Just to confuse you further, this building was the original site for the Union Square Savings Bank, created in 1924 by Henry Bacon, the designer of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC. The building is now the home of the Daryl Roth Theatre.














American Savings Bank
420 Park Avenue South

Tuesday, July 31, 2007

If Time Were Money . . .


Originally S. Jarmulowsky's Bank Building
54-58 Canal Street
Architects: Rouse & Goldstone
1912



. . . then Sender Jarmulowsky, the former pushcart peddler, would be very rich today. His grand symbol of capitalism lasted a lot longer than his bank, which was shuttered in 1917 amid rumors of fraud.

Monday, July 30, 2007

Manufactured Time


1513 First Avenue
at 79th Street











Notice the acorn on the casing? No oak tree will be growing from this bank's clock.








Manufacturers Hanover Trust
40 East 42nd Street at Madison Avenue









Perfectly utilitarian, which is more than we can say for Manufacturers Hanover Trust these days.



Manufacturers Hanover Trust
10th Avenue between 56th and 57th Street








This mantle clock always reminded me of the Seth Thomas clock my mother inherited from an uncle. Hers didn't have the barbed wire pigeon-detractor, but it didn't work either.